Monday, November 9, 2015

New and Revised Agriculture Publications, October 2015

October new #EDISpubs in the Agriculture program area include creeping indigo, citrus pruning & weed control, & poultry nutrition.



Creeping Indigo, a Poisonous Plant of Concern in Florida Pastures
A recent rise in suspected horse poisonings has brought new attention to creeping indigo (Indigofera spicata), a toxic plant which has reportedly been in Florida for as long as 90 years. This new 5-page fact sheet covers plant description, signs of creeping indigo toxicity, and roles of creeping indigo’s toxins, as well as treatment and management. Written by Robert MacKay, Ed Jennings, Brent Sellers, Jason Ferrell, and Amanda House, and published by the UF Department of Agronomy, August 2015.


Guidelines for Purchasing and Using Commercial Natural Enemies and Biopesticides in North America
This guide provides assistance in selecting, purchasing, and using commercially available natural enemies and biopesticides for managing pest problems. The guide assists in the identification of pests by habitat and lists types of natural enemies (parasitic nematodes, predatory mites, predatory insects, and parasitic wasps) and biopesticides available to manage these pests. Scientific and product names are provided both for insect and mite natural enemies and for some of the most common microbial insecticides, nematicides, and fungicides that can be used to manage pests. Biological control companies are listed along with their websites, and the guide provides additional sources of information on obtaining and using commercial natural enemies. Written by Lynn M. LeBeck and Norman C. Leppla, and published by the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology, October 2015.

Understanding Nitrogen Transformations and Cycling for Sweet Corn Production in Sandy Soils
Because sandy soils have low water and nutrient-holding capacities and Florida experiences high rainfall periodically, optimizing fertilizer use efficiency for sweet corn production is challenging. The preparation of nitrogen budgets and the implementation of effective management strategies can help farmers overcome these obstacles. This 4-page fact sheet discusses major concerns which call for nitrogen management in sweet corn production, nitrogen budget preparation and interpretation, and important differences between farm-gate and soil system budgets. Written by Rishi Prasad and George Hochmuth, and published by the UF Department of Soil and Water Science, May 2015.


Maximizing Weed Control in Florida Citrus
With Florida citrus growers and production managers being “squeezed” between rising production prices and declining yields from citrus greening, there’s more call than ever to reduce citrus production costs. Controlling weeds is a major expense, amounting to 11% of the total $2,278 annual production cost per acre for the 2014–2015 season. This 3-page fact sheet teaches the six essential components of an effective weed-management program to help maintain the profitability of this vital Florida industry. Written by Stephen H. Futch and Brent Sellers and published by the Horticultural Sciences Department.

Mechanical Pruning of Citrus Trees
When citrus trees are not regularly pruned, less sunlight reaches the lower parts of the trees, which can reduce flowering and fruit development, quality, and color. Less sunlight also increases the risk of fungal infection. This 3-page fact sheets explains how growers can prune trees to maximize light exposure. Written by Mongi Zekri, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, August 2015.


Avian Diseases Transmissible to Humans
Anyone who keeps birds, whether as pets or as production animals, should be aware that certain avian diseases can be transmitted to humans. The seriousness of the disease in humans varies with human hosts’ age, overall health, and immune status as well as virulence of the organism, infective dose, and route of infection. This 4-page fact sheet is a major revision which discusses causes and symptoms of avian influenza (bird flu), chlamydiosis, salmonellosis, colibacillosis, encephalitis viruses, avian tuberculosis, Newcastle Disease, and cryptosporidiosis. Written by Michael A. Davis, Gary D. Butcher, and F. Ben Mather, and published by the UF Department of Animal Sciences. Original publication date: August 1997, revised August 2015.

Small Flock Poultry Nutrition
Inadequate poultry nutrition results in substandard growth rates as well as decreased egg production and weight. In order to express the genetic potential for which they were selected, meat- and egg-type birds must receive the correct amounts of nutrients and energy through properly formulated rations. This 4-page fact sheet examines the roles of water, carbohydrates, proteins and amino acids, lipids (fats and oils), vitamins, minerals, and feed additives in poultry growth and development. It also emphasizes the importance of providing suitable feeds to birds of different ages and discusses common feeding mistakes. Written by Michael A. Davis, published by the UF Department of Animal Sciences, and reviewed and revised August 2015. This fact sheet is a major revision of “Small Poultry Flock Nutrition,” written by B. L. Damron and D. R. Sloan, April 1998.

Sous Vide Cookery: Foodservice Application for Larger, Less Tender Cuts
Meat with an abundance of connective tissue presents a certain challenge to cooks who want to make it more tender while still properly eliminating pathogens that cause foodborne illness. Sous vide cookery provides precise temperature control and tenderness improvement with minimal supervision throughout cooking as well as consistent, almost perfect reproducibility. This 4-page fact sheet introduces the reader to the sous vide method and covers its advantages and necessary equipment. The piece also offers tips on cooking, chilling, storing, and reheating large cuts of meat. Written by Chad Carr, Derek Griffing, Kaylie Madore, Dwain Johnson, Jason Scheffler, and João Neto, and published by the UF Department of Animal Sciences, September 2015.




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