Monday, April 7, 2014

Free Webinar on Urban Ag Viability

ATTRA - National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service

Free Webinar Will Focus on Urban Farming Viability

Local food was once considered to be in the purview of consumers and small-scale producers. Recently, policymakers, including those residing in cities, began embracing local food systems as a solution to a myriad of urban problems, including lack of green space and a dearth of healthy food availability. As part of this shift in policy, cities and other jurisdictions have embraced production in the urban environment.

But at the local and state levels, such policies are often based on a vision of how food might be grown in a city, and do not consider the feasibility or viability of such ventures. Nor do the policies consider how much of a contribution urban farms might make to urban food supplies.  
The question of how much food urban farms can supply is critical, given the small amount of land devoted to farming in urban areas. A further complicating factor is that many urban farms have claimed nonprofit status and often act as more as educational facilities rather than as commercial farms.  

A free April 29  webinar, "Urban Farms: Commercial Farms or Socially Minded Operations?" will provide an analysis of the differences between nonprofit and commercial urban farms, and is based on research conducted by researchers at NYU, Penn State, and NCAT-ATTRA. Funding for this study was provided by National Institute of Food and Agriculture, 2012-68006-30177.

The webinar will be recorded and archived on the ATTRA website at www.attra.ncat.org
 
To Register:  Go online at  https://attra.ncat.org/urban_farms

Webinar Title: Urban Farms: Commercial Farms or Socially Minded Operations?

Date: April 29

Time: 1 p.m. EDT

Participants:
•    Carolyn Dimitri, Associate Professor of Food Studies at NYU Steinhardt
•    Andy Pressman, National Center for Appropriate Technology Sustainable Agriculture Specialist
                     
Cost: Free

About the Presenters
Carolyn Dimitri is an applied economist who studies food systems and food policy. She is recognized as the leading expert in the procurement and marketing of organic food, and has published extensively on the distribution, processing, retailing, and consumption of organic food. Carolyn’s research spans the wide range of work on different aspects of the food system. She is currently studying urban agriculture in 15 cities around the country; food access in the urban setting; and the political economies of the national organic regulation. Carolyn has received grants from USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture, National Research Initiative, and Risk Management Agency, and Northeast Center for Risk Management Education. For more than a decade, she worked as a research economist at the Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. She is currently an Associate Editor of the journal Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, and is a member of the scientific board of the Organic Center. She earned a PhD in Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Andy Pressman is a Sustainable Agriculture Specialist with NCAT and its ATTRA Program. Andy works with farmers and educators in the fields of organic crop production, season extension, local food systems, urban agriculture, and farm energy. Andy has a MS degree in Sustainable Systems/Agroecology from Slippery Rock University and has a background in intensive farming systems.  Prior to joining NCAT in 2007, he spent several years managing small diversified farms located in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast regions.  Andy and his family currently operate Foggy Hill Farm, a small diversified family farm located in Jaffrey, New Hampshire.        

ATTRA—National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service—was developed and is maintained  through a cooperative agreement with the USDA’s Rural Business-Cooperative Service  by the National Center for Appropriate Technology, a nonprofit organization headquartered in Butte, Montana.

ATTRA has been the nation’s leading resource for information on sustainable agriculture since 1987, covering a wide range of topics, including reducing pesticide use on cropland, promoting food safety in sustainable production systems, reducing farm energy use and costs, enriching soils with the use of cover crops, and providing technical assistance in the growing areas of local farmers markets and urban gardening.

In addition to hundreds of sustainable-agriculture publications, ATTRA’s other popular offerings include a free sustainable-agriculture telephone helpline and the “Ask an Ag Expert” feature on the home page.  It has an archive of webinars and videos generated by NCAT and partnering organizations.

ATTRA also maintains numerous popular databases, including sustainable-agriculture internships and apprenticeships, and is a source for the day’s agriculture news, among other features.


Since 1976, the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) has been helping people by championing small-scale, local and sustainable solutions to reduce poverty, promote healthy communities and protect natural resources. In partnership with businesses, organizations, individuals and agricultural producers, NCAT is working to advance solutions that will ensure the next generation inherits a world that has clean air and water, energy production that is efficient and renewable, and healthy foods grown with sustainable practices. More information about its programs and services is available at www.ncat.org or by calling 1-800-ASK-NCAT.



 

 

 
 

 


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Since 1976, the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) has been helping people by championing small-scale, local and sustainable solutions to reduce poverty, promote healthy communities and protect natural resources. In partnership with businesses, organizations, individuals and agricultural producers, NCAT is working to advance solutions that will ensure the next generation inherits a world that has clean air and water, energy production that is efficient and renewable, and healthy foods grown with sustainable practices. More information about its programs and services is available at www.ncat.org or by calling 1-800-ASK-NCAT.


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National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) logo and link to home pageThe National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service - ATTRA - was developed and is managed by the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT). The project is funded through a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Agriculture's Rural Business-Cooperative Service.

Visit the NCAT website for more information on our other sustainable agriculture and energy projects.

© 2012 NCAT

 

 

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1 comment:

  1. SALVATION WITHOUT FORGIVENESS

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    Act 9:1-19......9 And he was three days without sight, and neither ate nor drank....

    Saul sins were forgiven in Damascus, three days later, not on the road to Damascus.
    Acts 22:1-16.....10 And I said, 'What shall I do Lord?' And the Lord said to me, 'Get up and go into Damascus, and there you will be told of all that has been appointed for you to do.'.......16 Now why do you delay? Get up and be baptized, and wash away your sins,calling on His name!

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    REASONS.
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    2. You have to be a Greek scholar to understand the Bible. If you understand the original Greek language, then you would know water baptism is not essential for forgiveness of sins.
    3. You need to use extra-Biblical writings to understand the plan of salvation.
    4. The Bible has been mistranslated, therefore men are saved by faith only and not the way it is presented in the Bible.

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    GOD IS INTELLIGENT ENOUGH TO GUIDE MEN TO GIVE A TRANSLATION OF THE BIBLE IN THE LANGUAGE THAT YOU READ! JUST READ IT AND BELIEVE IT.

    Men are not saved by faith only and there is no verse of Scripture that states men are saved by faith only. Men are saved by faith, but not by faith only.


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    ReplyDelete

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